All Career Advice

  • Most workers when asked will tell you they hate office politics. One poll of 169 employees found that 61 percent of people said they only reluctantly took part in office politics, while another 20 percent said they do their best to ignore office politics whenever they can.
  • At times, searching for a job can seem harder than peaking Everest. Writing an exceptionally articulate cover letter, polishing your resume so that it demonstrates that you are the most outstanding employee in existence, and hoping when you click “submit” your resume actually reaches a human bein...
  • Whether you’re a newly promoted boss, a project leader for the first time or just want to stand up for yourself with your own coworkers and boss—being assertive on the job can be tricky. You don’t want to find yourself in the next book about jerks in the workplace, but you don’t want to become th...
  • If you report to a lazy boss, you know all too well that you need strategies to not only lower your blood pressure, but surefire methods to increase your ability to take charge of your own success.
  • A major subtext of Shattered Glass, the film about a New Republic fabulist who made up or embellished stories, was the magazine staff’s unwillingness to accept a new editor after the firing of a beloved boss.... Don’t be that employee.
  • Washington, D.C., is a dynamic area to work in with plenty of opportunities. According to a spring 2015 survey conducted, Washington placed tenth in its top 25 cities for jobs. At that time there were 116,770 job openings in the District.
  • Toxic. Bully. Saboteur. Insecure. Narcissistic. Micromanager. Jerk. If any or all of these sound like your boss, welcome to the club no one wants to join. Fellow club members can tell you how to survive a bad boss and win by landing a better gig with a good boss.
  • One of my favorite lines ever from a commencement speech was given by Bill Gates. He said, “If you think your teacher is tough, wait till you get a boss.”
  • There is a term in the working world called “job hopping.” It is used to describe employees who spend less than a few years with a company.
  • HR needs to become solution-oriented in a much broader sense. Read why.
  • If you aren't feeling recognized at work, don't walk storm around, grumpy and irritable. Take action and receive what you deserve.
  • Finding a job focuses on short-term goals (with potential for long-term if the right choices are made), and a career is all about planning and following a specific path. Choices made now affect the direction you'll be taking tomorrow. It all depends on where you want to be.
  • After your boss says her piece in your one on one, don’t move toward the door. It’s your turn to ask questions.
  • In today's fast-paced world, are leaders and managers as easily separated as they were in decades past? Has the line blurred? If so, what attributes can apply to both managers and leaders?
  • There’s a certain advantage to dealing with the devil you know, and that’s why counteroffers are tempting.
  • If you forget to write a thank you note to your grandmother, it's likely she'll still love you. But if you can’t navigate the manners minefield at work, you could be out of a job. Changing technology has led to the relaxing of some standards, but many manners mandates from years ago remain curren...
  • Sometimes hard work isn’t enough. Knowing your worth can make your decision to leave your current job easier. When your best efforts are not rewarded, it is time to move on. But do so graciously.
  • If you want to move ahead in your career, join the minority of employees who don’t merely complete tasks but also bring value to the workplace. In other words, think like a business owner.